As you know, Microsoft Project is a tool for planning and tracking progress of given projects. While there is a lot of time invested for project planning, people (call them Project Managers) usually have no strategy for project tracking, or, if they have, they have one method for the tracking of all tasks. That doesn’t always work out so well.

Task progress can be tracked very simply or in very, very complicated ways. It can be tracked by tracking duration passed or spent, or by tracking work spent.

What is the biggest problem with task tracking? To learn all possibilities that MS Project has? NO! As any other tool, with more or less effort, you can learn anything. The biggest problem is how to get real and accurate data! For example, I once saw a PM who recorded 37% completed like this:

 

That same PM noted 35% of work completed like this:

 

Is this wrong? Well, it depends. From my point of view, if a task’s duration is five days and I put 37% in the completed field, it means that 1.85 days is spent on a task! The question is, how did I get this information?

I would like to show you all ways of tracking progress with MS Project, but if I did, this article will be way to long. Instead, I encourage you to join my webinar at which I will explain step by step how to track progress of project tasks in many different ways. After attending, you will have a clear picture of how to take the right tracking strategy for different tasks, how to put the right values at right time, and how to get the best results. That is, you’ll know how your project is standing at any particular moment!

See you at the webinar!