Author: Chad Olson

Director of Technical Services, Sensei Project Solutions Chad has been involved in the Microsoft Project Server platform and related products since 2001. He has focused on the technical aspects of installation, design, architecture, configuration, and customized reporting. Chad has completed over 35 different customer engagements utilizing Microsoft Project Server that has spanned across many different vertical industries. He is very involved in keeping up to date with the latest technical news of Project Server, is connected with the Microsoft Project product team, and has presented at the Microsoft Project Users Group (MPUG). He has conducted training classes for administrators, report authors, and project managers on the toolset with processes and procedures for several clients.

How to Upgrade to the 2016 Version of Project Pro for Office 365

Project Pro for Office 365 is the subscription-based edition of Microsoft Project. It’s paid as a monthly service and can also be combined with a Project Online license to give you full capabilities of the online project and portfolio management (PPM) solution. You can also use Project Pro for Office 365 as a standalone desktop application, as well as to connect to an on-premises installation of Project Server 2013 or the upcoming Project Server 2016. The application runs as a click-to-run application, which means it can easily be installed from any Windows-based machine with Internet access. It also gives you the added benefit of allowing installation of the software on up to five devices. By default, Office updates are also downloaded and installed so the product is always up to date. Several of our clients have had some confusion on how to obtain the latest version of Project with their existing deployment of Project Online. This article outlines the steps to follow in order to upgrade your Project Pro for Office 365 from the 2013 version (15.0) to the 2016 version (16.0). The process might be slightly different based on your tenant global administrator settings for deploying software to your organization, but this article should cover all scenarios. Manage User Software in Office 365 The first setting you should have your global administrator for Office 365 check is whether Project is turned on to be managed through Office 365. This is accessed from the Office 365 Portal. You then go to Service Settings | User software and validate that Project is checked. If this isn’t selected, you will need to install the product using the “software deployment method,” which I describe shortly. Service Branches Next, you need to know what service branch you’re on. If you’re not using Office 365 Home and Personal subscriptions, then you’re on a branch called Current Branch, which receives monthly feature and security updates. If you have Office Pro Plus from an enterprise Office 365 plan, then you have two available services branches: Standard Release (or Current Branch for Business) and First Release (or First Release for Current Branch for Business). Standard Release is the default option where you and your users receive the latest feature updates when they’re distributed broadly to all Office 365 customers; this occurs three times a year. This gives you extra time to prepare your support staff and users for upcoming changes. For Office 2016 as well as Project 2016, this release will be on the Standard Release in February 2016 and users will start to get notifications to install it at that point. If you want to get it now and not wait until February, then you need to be part of the First Release program. Your administrator can set select specific users for the First Release program or turn it on for the entire organization. To access these settings, go to the Office 365 Portal and then go to Service Settings | Updates: Installation You can choose to manually install the program, or as a network administrator you can package up the installation for deployment to your users. Note that this installation is an upgrade and replaces your previous versions. You can’t install the 2013 and 2016 versions side-by-side. It’s also important to know that you must be running the Microsoft Office suite as a subscription as well; you can’t mix and match subscription installations and perpetual MSI-based installations of Office, Visio or Project. Manual Install After you join the First Release program, you can manually install the software yourself if you have administrator rights to install software on your machine. To manually install, sign into the Office 365 login page. Then go to the Settings (Gear icon) | Office 365 settings: Choose Settings | Install and manage software: Choose Project in the left-hand navigation under Software: Scroll to the bottom and choose to Install Project 2016. Here, you can also change your Language and version (32-bit or 64-bit). After you make those selections, click the Install button: Software Deployment As a network administrator, you can choose to create a deployment package for your users to install rather than having them use the portal page. The following outlines those steps: 1. Download the Office Deployment Tool (Office 2016 version) from the Microsoft Download Center.2. Double-click OfficeDeploymentTool.exe to extract the Setup.exe file and the sample configuration.xml file.3. Use a text editor (like Notepad) to edit the configuration.xml file like this: <Configuration><Add OfficeClientEdition=”32″ Branch=”FirstReleaseCurrent”><Product ID=”ProjectProRetail”><Language ID=”en-us” /></Product></Add><Updates Enabled=”TRUE” /><Display Level=”None” AcceptEULA=”TRUE” /><Logging Level=”Standard” Path=”%temp% /></Configuration> Note: This installs the First Release for Current Branch, 32-bit, English version of Project Pro from the Office Content Delivery Network (CDN) on the Internet. It also automatically gets updated from the CDN when available. Learn more about configuration.xml settings in this reference article. 4. Copy setup.exe and configuration.xml to the computer where you want Office 2016. An Internet connection is required. 5. From an elevated command prompt, go to the folder where you copied the files and run the following command: Setup.exe /configure configuration.xml This copies the Project files to the computer and starts the installation. I hope this article gives you enough information to get started in installing the 2016 version of Project Pro for Office 365. After February 2016, the update will be part of the Standard Release (or Current Branch for Business), and you’ll start getting notifications to install. You can now start enjoying all the new features in Project 2016, including resource engagements and multiple timeline bars.

This is a bubble chart. The position on the y-axis represents the month, and the position on the x-axis represents the cost of the project. The size of the bubble indicates the amount of work done on the project. The largest bubble is in the top right corner, representing a project with a high cost and a lot of work done. The smallest bubble is in the bottom left corner, representing a project with a low cost and a small amount of work done. The other bubbles represent projects with varying costs and amounts of work done.

Animated Reporting for Microsoft PPM

Introduction One of the most common requests from we get from executives is for the ability to view the entire portfolio of projects and how these projects progress through a fiscal year.  The play axis feature in Power View solves this problem nicely with a time-phased, visual overview of the entire portfolio.  By animating the progress of projects, executives can see what time of the year they should be paying extra attention to specific projects.  The color-coding shows how projects align with departments, enterprise project types, project owner, etc.  The size of the bubble can show total costs, total work or other pertinent information.  As the animation plays, outlier projects in the portfolio will quickly become visible.  Filters show sub-portfolios or draw attention to projects with health status of ‘Red’ or ‘Yellow’. Power View is an interactive data exploration, visualization, and presentation experience that encourages intuitive ad-hoc reporting. Power View is now available in Microsoft Excel 2013. Power View can interact with data in the same Excel workbook as the Power View sheet, in data models within PowerPivot, or tabular models within SQL Server 2012 Analysis Services (SSAS) instances. Project Online allows for the use of the Open Data Protocol (OData) to query for data in your reports. You can also use OData for your Project Server 2013 instances on-premises or hosted. When you connect to an OData feed within Excel 2013, it will build the PowerPivot data model for you and you can use this to manipulate the data model if desired. Solution In this post, we will show how to set up a Power View report showing a bubble chart of projects that are time phased each month to show cost and work values using the play axis per month to show the changes visually over time.  To see the end result, click on the screenshot below and watch the video of the animated report, then follow the instructions to build your own.   Initial Setup The first step is you need to have Excel 2013 and you need to have Power View and PowerPivot enabled. If they are not enabled, go to File > Options > Add-Ins. From the Manage dropdown box, select COM Add-ins and select the Go button. From there you can select the checkboxes for “Power View” and “Microsoft Office PowerPivot for Excel 2013” and select OK. You will need to exit Excel and restart the application for these add-ins to load. You will also need permissions to access these OData feeds to author and view this report. If you are using Project Server permissions mode, you will need the Allow permission for the global permission called “Access Project Server Reporting Service”. If you are running SharePoint Permissions mode, you will need to be a member of one of the following groups: Portfolio Viewers, Portfolio Managers, or Administrators. If you are running Project Online, you will also need to enable Excel Web App to refresh the OData feeds in your report. Setup Data Connections In this example, we want to get assignments for each day but only for the year 2013. We are doing this mainly for performance as there could be hundreds of thousands of daily assignments and that will affect performance in obtaining and refreshing the data. Since we are filtering the data results we are going to need to set up unique data connections into the Excel 2013 workbook. The data sets we need are AssignmentTimephasedDataSet, Assignments, and Projects. AssignmentTimephasedDataSet The first data connection will be to the AssignmentTimephasedDataSet data set and we want to filter it to just days within 2013 and just select the columns we need for this report. The URL string path to use for the OData feed would look like below. <URL to PWA>/_api/ProjectData/AssignmentTimephasedDataSet()?$filter=TimeByDay ge datetime’2013-01-01T00:00:00′ and TimeByDay lt datetime’2014-01-01T00:00:00’&$select=TimeByDay,AssignmentId,AssignmentWork,AssignmentCost Note: Edit the <URL to PWA> section to match the URL to your PWA instance, such as Once Power View and PowerPivot are enabled, launch Excel 2013, open and blank workbook and go to the Data tab and choose From Other Sources > From OData Data Feed. In the Location of the data feed section paste in your full URL for the AssignmentTimephasedDataSet, such as: ge datetime’2013-01-01T00:00:00′ and TimeByDay lt datetime’2014-01-01T00:00:00’&$select=TimeByDay,AssignmentId,AssignmentWork,AssignmentCost Keep the defaults and click Next and then click the checkbox to select the AssignmentTimephasedDataSet() table and click Next. For the File Name, change it to AssignmentTimephasedDataSet.odc and change the Friendly Name to AssignmentTimephasedDataSet. Click Finish and then choose to Only Create Connection. Click OK.   You will notice in the bottom status bar that it is Retrieving Data and shows the number of rows processed. Wait for this to complete before proceeding. Since we limited the scope to only 2013 this should help with performance with this data collection.   You will now need to change the data source connection type so it isn’t using a locally stored Office Data Connection file. You can choose to export it to SharePoint or have it embedded in the report. I prefer to have it embedded in the report and strictly use SharePoint to store data connection files if they will be reused for multiple reports. To embed the query as a Data Feed you need to make any change to the connection string. Go to the Data tab and choose Connections and highlight the connection name and choose Properties, then select the Definition tab and go into the Connection String box. I’ve chosen to change the value of the Max Received Message Size and changed the number to have a “0” at the end instead of a “4”. Note the change highlighted in blue below. If you know of a better way to change the Connection Type easily, please provide an answer in the comments.   Click OK and you should get a message saying the connection is no longer identical and click Yes to break the connection.   Highlight the connection again and click Properties. In the Usage tab, check the box for “Refresh data when opening the file”.   Note: If you have a lot of assignments by day records, you might want to uncheck this and only save in Excel say each month and then have Excel Services just use that last saved cached values. Another option would be to get less data, say 6 months instead of a full year. On the Definition tab, notice the connection type got changed to Data Feed when you broke the connection from the original office data file. This will keep the query embedded in the Excel file.   Assignments Add another data connection for Assignments by repeating the same steps above but substitute the URL for: <URL to PWA>/_api/ProjectData/Assignments()?$select=AssignmentId,ProjectId Note: We are not using any filters on the Assignments. You could use Finish Date or Start Date filters if desired. We are however limiting the number of columns returned to decrease the size of the file transferred to help with performance. Projects Repeat the same steps above but substitute the URL for: <URL to PWA>/_api/ProjectData/Projects Note: We are not using any filters on Projects. You could use Finish Date, Start Date, or Percent Completed filters if desired. I also choose to return all columns to give some flexibility on which columns you can use on your report. Data Model Changes in PowerPivot Once all three data connections have been added to the workbook, you can manage the data model within PowerPivot. To do this, click on the POWERPIVOT tab and then click the Manage button form the ribbon. You should notice each data set has a separate tab and it shows the data to you in rows and columns.   There are a few changes we want to make to the data model while we are here in PowerPivot. The first is let’s create a new Month column within the AssignmentTimephasedDataSet tab that shows it in the format of the first day of the month so it sorts correctly. To add the new Month column, go to the far right of the AssignmentTimephasedDataSet tab and double-click where it says “Add Column” and type in the word Month and press Enter. It should now highlight the entire column and then type in the formula bar the DAX expression of =[TimeByDay]-Day([TimeByDay])+1 and press Enter. Then with this column still highlighted, go to the Format section in the ribbon and choose the short date format (*3/14/2001). Ok, now we have a new column for Month that will look nicely in the play axis. The other cosmetic things you can do are renaming columns by double-clicking on the column header. From the Projects dataset you can rename columns such as “EnterpriseProjectTypeName” to “Enterprise Project Type”, “ProjectName” to “Project name”, “ProjectOwnerName” to “Project Owner”, “ProjectHealth” to “Project Health” (you might not have this custom field in your environment), “ProjectCost” to “Total Project Cost”,  and “ProjectDepartments” to “Project Departments”. In the AssignmentTimesphasedDataSet tab, I’ve also renamed “AssignmentCost” to “Project Cost” and “AssignmentWork” to “Project Work”. The final thing we need to do with our data model is create relationships between these datasets. To do this, go to the Design tab within PowerPivot and click the Create Relationship button from the ribbon. Create the three relationships as follows: Table: AssignmentTimephasedDataSet Column: AssignmentId with Related Lookup Table: Assignments Related Lookup Column: AssignmentId Table: Assignments Column: ProjectId with Related Lookup Table: Projects Related Lookup Column: ProjectId If you click on the Manage Relationships button it should look like this below. Click Close after verifying the information is the same.   You can now switch back to the workbook by clicking on the “Switch to Workbook” button in the top left corner.   Power View Report To add a Power View report to your workbook, go to the Insert tab and click the Power View report button. It then opens up a new Power View sheet and shows the Power View Fields available from our data model. To start the design process, expand the Projects data set in the Power View Fields section and check Project name. Then expand the AssignmentTimephasedDataSet and check Project Cost and Project Work. You will notice Power View by defaults adds it as a table. You can also format the Project Cost to currency by clicking on one of the Project Cost values in the table and then selecting Currency in the dropdown from the Design tab. We want to change it to a bubble chart, which is a form of a scatter chart. To do this, from the Design tab click Other Chart and choose Scatter. Go ahead and expand the corners to make the chart take up the entire page width and most of the height (up to the title box). Click the title box and rename it to “2013 Project Work and Cost per Month”. The other items we want to add to the report are to color the bubbles by Enterprise Project Type, add the Month to the play axis, and size the bubbles by total project cost. To do this, click on the chart to show the Power View Fields and then drag the Enterprise Project Type from the Projects data set to the Color section, the Month from the AssignmentTimephasedDataSet data set to the Play Axis, and the Total Project Cost from the Projects data set to Size. The fields in your chart design should look like the following below.   Next, go to the Layout tab and choose Title > None to remove the top title from the chart. The final step is to add some filters. Drag the following fields to the Filters section. All of these are from the Projects data set. Enterprise Project Type Project Departments Project Health (you might not have this custom field in your environment) Project Owner Your report should look something like this now:   Press the Play button on the Month play axis to watch the report in action. The final step is to delete Sheet1 or hide it and then save it to your Business Intelligence site within SharePoint 2013. The report will run and interact within the browser and the user will not need to have Excel 2013 to view it. Conclusion Using some new technologies in Excel 2013 such as Power View and PowerPivot shows new and exciting ways to expose your data visually in Project Online or Project Server 2013 on-premises installations.     About Sensei Project Solutions Sensei Project Solutions is a Microsoft Partner specializing in Project and Portfolio Management (PPM) deployments with Microsoft Project and Project Server on the SharePoint platform. With extensive experience on hundreds of PPM deployments and with thousands of users trained, Sensei Project Solutions brings a process-focused approach; and support for industry standards and best practices to all engagements. We offer a complete set of services to help an organization make their Microsoft PPM deployment successful, including full implementation and support services, training, as well as pre-configured solutions and report packs. info@senseiprojectsolutions.com

Image shows how To change a fixed duration task to an effort driven task, you need to change the task type to fixed units or fixed work.

Tracking Non-Project Work Using Microsoft Project and Project Server

Introduction Many clients have asked us how to best track their non-project work leveraging Microsoft Project and Project Server. Non-project work can be any type of sustaining work that isn’t planned at the project level. Common examples for an IT organization are help desk activities, break/fix operations, or any other Business As Usual (BAU) tasks. Typically, these work activities just need to be scheduled at a high level (typically yearly) and a certain percentage of a resource’s time needs to be allocated to these activities. Using Microsoft Project with Project Server, you can assign team members to these support projects and have them track their actual work there.  Management will then have a good picture of overall resource capacity and remaining availability when accounting for both non-project and project work. Goal The objective is to allocate a certain percentage of a resource’s time to a support project to show resource allocation and to allow tracking of actual hours spent on non-project work. The solution must keep consistent resource allocation percentage even after actual work has been entered that varies from the planned work. Solution The following five steps are required to set up and maintain this solution in Microsoft Project and Project Server. Initial Setup Resource Allocation Setup for Actual Work Entry Actual Work Entry Maintenance Note: This solution is just one possible method to achieve the desired outcome. I’m sure there other methods that could be used. This is just one that has worked for us and many of our clients. Also, note that these screenshots were taken from a Project Server 2010 environment but could also be used for Project Server 2013. Some of the techniques could also be used for earlier versions of Project Server or standalone Microsoft Project. Initial Setup The initial setup is done to define the duration of the tasks. You are only concerned about the duration of the tasks at this point. A common approach is to set up all tasks in the schedule to be one year in duration. Set up your task Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) with whatever amount of detail that you desire. Typically, these tasks are at a very high level. You want it to be easy for your team members to track time to. Set all Tasks to be Fixed Duration, Non-Effort Driven and Auto Scheduled Task Mode. You can add these columns to the Gantt Chart or create an enterprise view that all users can utilize. Set the Project Start Date if you haven’t already. Set the Duration for all the tasks to be whatever gets the Finish Date to the end of the year (or 2 or 3 years, etc). Note, you must use days for duration (do not use eDays or set a finish date). If you want Project to calculate the duration for you, you can add a temporary task and set the Actual Start and Actual Finish dates and then Project will give you the duration. Then delete this task and use the duration value for the other tasks. Resource Allocation The Resource Allocation section sets the percentage of work allocated to each resource to the support project. Typically, this percentage is obtained from the Resource Manager or Functional Manager that determines how a person’s time should be allocated. Add resources to your project if you haven’t already. Assign Resources to appropriate tasks to make assignments. Do not concern yourself with the Work values or over-allocations at this time. Set up a Resource Usage view with the following settings: On the left side: Add the following columns: Resource Name, Work, Max Units, Peak, and Assignment Units. On the right side: Change the Timescale to Middle Tier: Years; Bottom Tier: Months Add the following Detail Styles: Baseline Work, Work, Actual Work, All Assignment Rows. Arrange them in that order as well. Your finished view should look like the one below. You can save this view and table to the enterprise global if you are using Project Server and then all users can utilize this custom Resource Usage view. 3.  Determine the allocation for each resource. This will probably involve asking the resource manager or functional manager what percentage of the resource’s time to allocate to this support project. In this example, we are going to assign Worker Bee at 80% for the project. Worker Bee is assigned to 4 concurrent tasks in the project so we are going to divide it up evenly (80/4) and assign 20% assignment units to each task. Note the Peak column to verify the rollup. Notice, now that the work has changed to an even 20% allocation for the entire duration for each task rolling up to 80% total. The tasks don’t need to be all set to the same assignment units but they do need to add up to the determined amount for the resources. 4. Once all the allocations and work distributions look good then set an initial Baseline and Save the project (do not publish the project yet). Notice the Baseline Work values were added in the Details section. Set up for Actual Work Entry The following section details the steps necessary before you have team members track time to this project. Now that the work has been distributed the way you intend, you need to make sure that it keeps a consistent work allocation percentage when the actual work has been entered. Set the Task Type for all tasks to Fixed Units (Non-Effort Driven) and make certain that none of the tasks are milestones. Note: Summary Tasks will always be Fixed Duration and should not have any resources assigned. Publish the project. Actual Work Entry Actual Work will be entered by team members using either My Tasks or Timesheets and then accepted by the Project Manager and the work will change accordingly. By setting up Fixed Units tasks, the allocation percentage will stay the same except at the end. If the actual work is less than the planned work, Project adds work at the end and increases the duration (however it keeps a steady allocation percentage). If the actual work is greater than the planned work, Project subtracts work from the end and decreases the duration (however it keeps a steady allocation percentage). In the example below we have 10 actual hours in January 2013 (highlighted below in green) for the task “BAU Tickets” (less than originally planned (36.8h)) and 80 actual hours in January 2013 for the task “Software Installations” (more than planned (38.6h)). The first task “BAU Tickets” kept the same work values for the remaining months and added 26.8 hours in January 2014 (highlighted above in red). In the second task “Software Installations” it kept the same work values for the remaining months but reduced November 2013 to 25.6 and removed work for December 2013. This keeps a consistent 20% allocation for each task but removes work or adds work to the end of the task. The orange line represents the original baseline finish date. Maintenance The maintenance in this project would be to review the project once a month (or once a year if you set up a 5 year duration project) and change the work values to what was initially set as the baseline work values. This will keep the allocation consistent. In this example, I would delete the planned work from January 2014 for the “BAU Tickets” task and add planned work to the “Software Installations” task for November 2013 and December 2013 to match the baseline work values. Additionally, check to make certain that tasks that have not had work assigned to them have not reverted to milestones.  If they have, change them back to regular tasks by unchecking “Mark Task as Milestone” in the “Advanced tab” of the task information dialog box. Publish the project after the edits have been made each month. Auto Accept Updates Most likely if you are using Project Server, you will want to automatically accept the actual work hours submitted by the team members from either My Tasks or Timesheets. To do this, the Project Owner goes to PWA -> Approval Center. You then click Manage Rules from the ribbon. You then click on the New button from the ribbon to set up a new rule. Fill out a name for the rule and set the options to “Automatically run this rule” and “Automatically publish the updates”. Note: The option to “Automatically publish the updates” was introduced with Service Pack 1 for Project Server 2010. Leave the Request Types to Task Updates for All Updates, set the Projects option to Specific projects, then choose your support project and click Add. Leave the default Resources option to All my current and future resources. Adding New Resources or New Tasks The same process needs to be done when adding new resources to existing tasks or new tasks within the schedule. You will need to add the resource first to the project team. Then you will need to change the task type back to “Fixed Duration” and “Non-Effort Driven” for each task you intend to assign to the new resource(s). Then assign the resource(s) to those existing tasks or new tasks. You then need to highlight the tasks that have the new assignments on them and “Set a Baseline” and choose “Selected Tasks” and to choose to roll up baselines “To all summary tasks”. Once you are ready to track actuals on them again, set the task type to “Fixed Units” and “Non Effort Driven”. Publish the schedule. Changing Allocation If you need to change the allocation for a resource, you simply change the Assignment Units in your Resource Usage view for the tasks that are assigned to that person. You then need to baseline those tasks as done in the previous step. Publish the schedule after making the needed allocation changes. Conclusion Hopefully the steps outlined above will get you started tracking non-project work within Microsoft Project and Project Server. This will give you visibility to all work done within your organization and give you true resource capacity and demand metrics to help you make better decisions.   About Sensei Project Solutions Sensei Project Solutions is a Microsoft Partner specializing in Project and Portfolio Management (PPM) deployments with Microsoft Project and Project Server on the SharePoint platform. With extensive experience on hundreds of PPM deployments and with thousands of users trained, Sensei Project Solutions brings a process-focused approach; and support for industry standards and best practices to all engagements. We offer a complete set of services to help an organization make their Microsoft PPM deployment successful, including full implementation and support services, training, as well as pre-configured solutions and report packs. info@senseiprojectsolutions.com

Webinar: Business Intelligence – Get started on Project Server Reporting

Project Management Institute (PMI)® Professional Development Units (PDUs): This Webinar is eligible for 1 PMI® PDU in the Power Skills Category of the Talent Triangle. Business Intelligence  – Get started on Project Server Reporting by Chad Olson, MCTS MCSE MCP “Project Server 2010 provides us with an abundance of data and SharePoint 2010 has all the Business Intelligence (BI) tools to help report on that data. This presentation and demonstrations will cover how to access data in the OLAP cubes, write simple SQL statements to create great looking SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS) reports and use PerformancePoint to surface great looking dashboards to executives. This presentation is focused towards project managers and executives that know the data and just need a little help getting access to it and start building dynamic reports right away.” Chad Olson, MCTS MCSE MCP Chad has been involved in the Microsoft Project Server platform and related products since 2001. He has focused on the technical aspects of installation, design, architecture, configuration, and customized reporting. Chad has completed over 35 different customer engagements utilizing Microsoft Project Server that has spanned across many different vertical industries. He is very involved in keeping up to date with the latest technical news of Project Server, is connected with the Microsoft Project product team, and has presented at the Microsoft Project Users Group (MPUG). He has conducted training classes for administrators, report authors, and project managers on the toolset with processes and procedures for several clients. About Sensei Project Solutions: Sensei Project Solutions holds the Microsoft Partner Silver Project & Portfolio Management (PPM) Competency.  Specializing in PPM deployments with the Microsoft Project and Project Server on the SharePoint platform.  With extensive experience on hundreds of PPM deployments and with thousands of users trained, Sensei Project Solutions brings a process-focused approach; and support for industry standards and best practices to all engagements. We offer a complete set of services to help an organization make their Microsoft PPM deployment successful, including full implementation and support services, training as well as pre-configured solutions and report packs. info@senseiprojectsolutions.com Have you watched this webinar recording? Tell MPUG viewers what you think! [WPCR_INSERT]